CHINA May Fourth spirit celebrated

CHINA

May Fourth spirit celebrated

China Daily

08:37, May 05, 2021

Young people across the nation celebrated National Youth Day on Tuesday through activities to inherit the May Fourth spirit in the new era.

Tuesday marked the 102nd anniversary of the May Fourth Movement in China.

The movement started with huge student protests on May 4, 1919, opposing the government's response to the Treaty of Versailles, which treated China unfairly and undermined the country's sovereignty in the aftermath of World War I. The movement triggered a national campaign to overthrow the old society and promote new ideas, including science, democracy and Marxism.

The May Fourth spirit refers to patriotism, progress, democracy and science, with patriotism at the core. In the new era, Chinese youth are expected to carry on the May Fourth spirit and to strive for national rejuvenation.

Young people pose for a photo at the location of the first National Congress of the Communist Party of China on Tuesday in Shanghai to mark National Youth Day, commemorating the May Fourth Movement. (Photo: Xinhua)

In Shanghai, up to 1,000 teenagers gathered on Tuesday morning at the site where the first CPC National Congress was held in 1921 to commemorate the history of the Communist Party of China. After a short lecture on CPC history, a themed relay activity began using four routes, which represented the four phases the Party went through in 100 years.

Participants, including popular users of video-sharing platform Bilibili, learned history and fostered stronger ideals by visiting Shanghai landmarks, guessing riddles and accomplishing tasks.

"Young deputies took part in the first CPC National Congress 100 years ago, speaking out with the powerful conviction of youth. As young people in the new era, we are key to keeping the country's vitality," a Bilibili user said, livestreaming the relay.

Students from Tianjin University "talked" with Zhang Tailei, a revolutionary martyr and an alumnus of the forerunner of the university, during a special lecture on campus.

Zhang's life was presented through drama and historical material to teach about his devotion to the people's happiness, Science and Technology Daily said.

Tian Shuo, a speaker at a lecture, said the innovative way of learning CPC history would encourage students to consider how to integrate their own development with the nation's development.

In Sichuan province, youth representatives visited a war memorial in the provincial capital Chengdu before Youth Day to pay tribute to martyrs who sacrificed their lives in the Battle of Chengdu in 1949, according to news site SCOL.com.

Members of the Communist Youth League of China, and young entrepreneurs in Chengdu spoke about CPC history education and how to carry on the spirit in their daily work and lives.

In the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, officials and youth representatives praised better development prospects for the city's youths and called on them to seize opportunities.

Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor stressed that the SAR government will work to help young people develop a strong sense of national identity, a love of Hong Kong, an awareness of civic responsibility and a global vision. Lam said that in September, the government will replace the Liberal Studies curriculum in schools with Citizenship and Social Development to foster a strong sense of civic responsibility and respect for the rule of law.

Lam called on young people in Hong Kong to seize the "abundant opportunities" arising from national development, including those presented by the 14th Five-Year Plan (2021-25) and the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area.

The city's leader also extended her congratulations to young people across the country. She commended the efforts and contributions of the younger generation in the face of the pandemic, during which youths have been actively involved in community volunteering and online learning when schools were forced to close.

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