CHINA Scholars condemn US House passage of Xinjiang-related bill

CHINA

Scholars condemn US House passage of Xinjiang-related bill

Xinhua

21:39, December 10, 2019

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File photo: CGTN

URUMQI, Dec. 10 (Xinhua) -- Scholars in Xinjiang have expressed great indignation over and issued strong condemnation for the passage of a Xinjiang-related bill by the U.S. House of Representatives.

The so-called "Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act of 2019" was approved by the U.S. House of Representatives earlier this month.

"It is a 'bill' built on lies, which hides the malicious intent of the United States to destabilize Xinjiang and contain China's development under the cloak of human rights," said Zulhayat Esmayil, dean of the school of Marxism at Xinjiang University.

The anti-terrorism and deradicalization measures taken in Xinjiang have guaranteed the rights to life, health and development of the people of all ethnic groups in accordance with the law, said Wang Huiming, head of the lawyers association of Urumqi, the capital city of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

The measures conform to the spirit and requirements of the rule of law and the basic principles clearly set forth in relevant conventions and initiatives of the international community, Wang added.

The work of vocational education and training in Xinjiang serves the fundamental interests of the people of all ethnic groups, said Mahmut Abduwali, deputy head of the institute of history, Xinjiang Academy of Social Sciences.

"The cultures of ethnic minorities in Xinjiang have not been subject to any restrictions, but have been vigorously promoted and protected by the government," said Muhtar Yasin, president of Xinjiang Arts University.

Schools of compulsory education in Xinjiang offer courses in the spoken and written languages of ethnic minorities, and languages and folk cultures of ethnic minorities have been respected and inherited, Yasin added.

Xinjiang has 83 national intangible cultural heritage projects, of which more than 95 percent are ethnic minority projects, said Yusuyin Haxim, deputy editor-in-chief of Xinjiang People's Publishing House.

"The future and destiny of Xinjiang need not be judged by some Western politicians and media. The people of all ethnic groups in Xinjiang have the say," said Haxim. "No force can stop Xinjiang's social stability and long-term peace, as well as the progress of Xinjiang." 

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