HEADLINE Video: Black 7-year-old forcibly removed from bus, triggering outrage in US

HEADLINE

Video: Black 7-year-old forcibly removed from bus, triggering outrage in US

By Shan Xin | People's Daily app

13:01, April 20, 2018

(Video: @Tariq Nasheed/ Facebook)

Another racial incident involving a black child has sparked backlashes in the US recently. A white teacher at Memphis Elementary is under investigation after being caught on video dragging a 7-year-old black boy off the school bus last week. 

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(Screenshots of video from NowThis)

In the video provided by NowThis, the white teacher grabbed and dragged the boy by his legs to remove him from the bus. The boy is seen crying and screaming “Mom” and “get your hands off me” during the struggle, which ends with the teacher forcefully taking him upside down from the bus, and left the boy with “a concussion and bruises on his backs”, according to his mom.

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"Because of how he was dragged, he hit his head,” his mom said.

A county representative said some students had been fighting, and the white teacher boarded the bus to intervene.

"My son wasn’t part of the fight,” the boy’s mother said, noting the incident was so traumatizing and violent that the boy doesn’t want to go back to school.

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This is not the first school discrimination to criminalize children of color. Data found that black students overall make up just 16 percent of public school enrollment but 42 percent of suspensions and expulsions. In reality, harsh school punishments have become one of the primary mechanisms through which the school-to-prison pipeline operates for black children.  

A 2015 study reports that black girls made up 90 percent of girls expelled during the 2011-2012 school year, in New York City, while no white girls were suspended at all. Young black girls in D.C. are 30 times more likely to be arrested than white girls and boys of the same age. In Boston, the numbers were just as bad. Sixty-three percent of the girls expelled that year were black, while no white girls were suspended that year.

Racism is far from being a thing of the past.

“When I seen this, my mind went back to 1967-68, when there were water hoses and people were being dragged,” said Walter Womack, civil rights leader in the US, during a broadcasting interview with FOX 13. “This 7-year-old boy being dragged off the bus like he was a common criminal.”

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