TRAVEL Dead Sea industry booms in SW China's Sichuan province

TRAVEL

Dead Sea industry booms in SW China's Sichuan province

People's Daily Online

17:24, October 26, 2020

The China Dead Sea tourist resort in Daying county, Suining city, was built in 2003, which recreates the characteristics of the Dead Sea by drawing salt lake water from 5,000 meters beneath the earth’s surface. (Photo: People's Daily Online)

In recent years, Daying county of Suining city, southwest China's Sichuan province, has been committed to applying brine culture and brine resources to developing its "Dead Sea" tourist industry.

A leisure and cultural tourism industry based on the concept of salt baths passed down for thousands of years has been developed, integrating floating, recuperation and vacationing in the "Dead Sea".

About 150 million years ago, two orogenic movements on the Earth formed underground ancient salt lakes in Sichuan Province. As early as the Spring and Autumn Period and the Warring States Period, water conservancy expert Li Bing and his son discovered underground brine when they went to Sichuan to control the waters. They then dug the first salt well in Sichuan and began to collect brine and fry salt.

After the middle of the Northern Song Dynasty, the "Zhuotong well" used for extracting brine appeared in Daying county, Suining city. In 2006, the State Council announced that deep salt drilling technology and extraction from the Zhuotong well would be included in the first batch of national intangible cultural heritages.

The China Dead Sea tourist resort in Daying county, Suining city, was built in 2003, which recreates the characteristics of the Dead Sea by drawing salt lake water from 5,000 meters beneath the earth’s surface.

As the salt content is similar to the "Dead Sea" in the Middle East, people can float effortlessly on the water, giving it the nickname the "Dead Sea of China".

In recent years, Daying county of Suining city, southwest China's Sichuan province, has been committed to applying brine culture and brine resources to developing its "Dead Sea" tourist industry.

A leisure and cultural tourism industry based on the concept of salt baths passed down for thousands of years has been developed, integrating floating, recuperation and vacationing in the "Dead Sea".

About 150 million years ago, two orogenic movements on the Earth formed underground ancient salt lakes in Sichuan Province. As early as the Spring and Autumn Period and the Warring States Period, water conservancy expert Li Bing and his son discovered underground brine when they went to Sichuan to control the waters. They then dug the first salt well in Sichuan and began to collect brine and fry salt.

After the middle of the Northern Song Dynasty, the "Zhuotong well" used for extracting brine appeared in Daying county, Suining city. In 2006, the State Council announced that deep salt drilling technology and extraction from the Zhuotong well would be included in the first batch of national intangible cultural heritages.

The China Dead Sea tourist resort in Daying county, Suining city, was built in 2003, which recreates the characteristics of the Dead Sea by drawing salt lake water from 5,000 meters beneath the earth’s surface.

As the salt content is similar to the "Dead Sea" in the Middle East, people can float effortlessly on the water, giving it the nickname the "Dead Sea of China".

In recent years, Daying county of Suining city, southwest China's Sichuan province, has been committed to applying brine culture and brine resources to developing its "Dead Sea" tourist industry.

A leisure and cultural tourism industry based on the concept of salt baths passed down for thousands of years has been developed, integrating floating, recuperation and vacationing in the "Dead Sea".

About 150 million years ago, two orogenic movements on the Earth formed underground ancient salt lakes in Sichuan Province. As early as the Spring and Autumn Period and the Warring States Period, water conservancy expert Li Bing and his son discovered underground brine when they went to Sichuan to control the waters. They then dug the first salt well in Sichuan and began to collect brine and fry salt.

After the middle of the Northern Song Dynasty, the "Zhuotong well" used for extracting brine appeared in Daying county, Suining city. In 2006, the State Council announced that deep salt drilling technology and extraction from the Zhuotong well would be included in the first batch of national intangible cultural heritages.

The China Dead Sea tourist resort in Daying county, Suining city, was built in 2003, which recreates the characteristics of the Dead Sea by drawing salt lake water from 5,000 meters beneath the earth’s surface.

As the salt content is similar to the "Dead Sea" in the Middle East, people can float effortlessly on the water, giving it the nickname the "Dead Sea of China".

In recent years, Daying county of Suining city, southwest China's Sichuan province, has been committed to applying brine culture and brine resources to developing its "Dead Sea" tourist industry.

A leisure and cultural tourism industry based on the concept of salt baths passed down for thousands of years has been developed, integrating floating, recuperation and vacationing in the "Dead Sea".

About 150 million years ago, two orogenic movements on the Earth formed underground ancient salt lakes in Sichuan Province. As early as the Spring and Autumn Period and the Warring States Period, water conservancy expert Li Bing and his son discovered underground brine when they went to Sichuan to control the waters. They then dug the first salt well in Sichuan and began to collect brine and fry salt.

After the middle of the Northern Song Dynasty, the "Zhuotong well" used for extracting brine appeared in Daying county, Suining city. In 2006, the State Council announced that deep salt drilling technology and extraction from the Zhuotong well would be included in the first batch of national intangible cultural heritages.

The China Dead Sea tourist resort in Daying county, Suining city, was built in 2003, which recreates the characteristics of the Dead Sea by drawing salt lake water from 5,000 meters beneath the earth’s surface.

As the salt content is similar to the "Dead Sea" in the Middle East, people can float effortlessly on the water, giving it the nickname the "Dead Sea of China".

In recent years, Daying county of Suining city, southwest China's Sichuan province, has been committed to applying brine culture and brine resources to developing its "Dead Sea" tourist industry.

A leisure and cultural tourism industry based on the concept of salt baths passed down for thousands of years has been developed, integrating floating, recuperation and vacationing in the "Dead Sea".

About 150 million years ago, two orogenic movements on the Earth formed underground ancient salt lakes in Sichuan Province. As early as the Spring and Autumn Period and the Warring States Period, water conservancy expert Li Bing and his son discovered underground brine when they went to Sichuan to control the waters. They then dug the first salt well in Sichuan and began to collect brine and fry salt.

After the middle of the Northern Song Dynasty, the "Zhuotong well" used for extracting brine appeared in Daying county, Suining city. In 2006, the State Council announced that deep salt drilling technology and extraction from the Zhuotong well would be included in the first batch of national intangible cultural heritages.

The China Dead Sea tourist resort in Daying county, Suining city, was built in 2003, which recreates the characteristics of the Dead Sea by drawing salt lake water from 5,000 meters beneath the earth’s surface.

As the salt content is similar to the "Dead Sea" in the Middle East, people can float effortlessly on the water, giving it the nickname the "Dead Sea of China".

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