WORLD Australia's endangered wallaby population bounces back after ferals fenced out

WORLD

Australia's endangered wallaby population bounces back after ferals fenced out

Xinhua

21:45, May 25, 2021

File photo taken on Sept. 26, 2018 shows bridled nailtail wallabies at the Avocet Nature Refuge in central Queensland, Australia. A population of bridled nailtail wallabies in the Australian state of Queensland has been brought back from the brink of extinction, after conservation scientists trialled an intervention technique never before used on land-based mammals. This new conservation strategy, revealed on Tuesday, was conducted by scientists at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), giving the bridled nailtail wallaby a head starting in life. The article has also been published in Current Biology. (Photo by Alexandra Ross/Xinhua)

File photo taken on Sept. 26, 2018 shows a bridled nailtail wallaby at the Avocet Nature Refuge in central Queensland, Australia. A population of bridled nailtail wallabies in the Australian state of Queensland has been brought back from the brink of extinction, after conservation scientists trialled an intervention technique never before used on land-based mammals. This new conservation strategy, revealed on Tuesday, was conducted by scientists at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), giving the bridled nailtail wallaby a head starting in life. The article has also been published in Current Biology. (Photo by Alexandra Ross/Xinhua)

File photo taken on Sept. 26, 2018 shows a bridled nailtail wallaby at the Avocet Nature Refuge in central Queensland, Australia. A population of bridled nailtail wallabies in the Australian state of Queensland has been brought back from the brink of extinction, after conservation scientists trialled an intervention technique never before used on land-based mammals. This new conservation strategy, revealed on Tuesday, was conducted by scientists at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), giving the bridled nailtail wallaby a head starting in life. The article has also been published in Current Biology. (Photo by Alexandra Ross/Xinhua)

File photo taken on Sept. 26, 2018 shows a bridled nailtail wallaby at the Avocet Nature Refuge in central Queensland, Australia. A population of bridled nailtail wallabies in the Australian state of Queensland has been brought back from the brink of extinction, after conservation scientists trialled an intervention technique never before used on land-based mammals. This new conservation strategy, revealed on Tuesday, was conducted by scientists at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), giving the bridled nailtail wallaby a head starting in life. The article has also been published in Current Biology. (Photo by Alexandra Ross/Xinhua)

File photo taken on Sept. 26, 2018 shows a bridled nailtail wallaby at the Avocet Nature Refuge in central Queensland, Australia. A population of bridled nailtail wallabies in the Australian state of Queensland has been brought back from the brink of extinction, after conservation scientists trialled an intervention technique never before used on land-based mammals. This new conservation strategy, revealed on Tuesday, was conducted by scientists at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), giving the bridled nailtail wallaby a head starting in life. The article has also been published in Current Biology. (Photo by Alexandra Ross/Xinhua)

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